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Welcome to the Faster Than 20 wiki, an open compendium of rough, raw thoughts about craft, practice, tools, and the world we live in. If you'd like to discuss or contribute to the content here, please join our public forum. We welcome your thoughts! Enjoy!

Craft | Tools | Checklists | Experiments | Projects | The World

Why We Do What We Do

Individually, humans are reasonably bad at adapting to change. Collectively, we've been able to manage it, but mostly by waiting for the old generation to die off so that the next generation can take over. This explains why — at our best — it takes about 20 years (one generation) for complex, social change to take place.

Unfortunately, that pace is no longer good enough. Our world is getting more complex faster than our ability to manage that complexity, which means that our problems are scaling faster than our ability to solve them. We have to find ways to adapt faster than 20 years. This requires us to get collectively smarter faster.

Not only is this an imperative for survival, it's a roadmap for a world that is more desirable, one that is thrivable.

Think of the best collaborative experience you've ever had, personal or professional. Imagine a world where all of your collaborative experiences — personal and professional — were at least as good as your best. Imagine a world where that were true of everyone's collaborative experiences. What would that world be like?

Our mission is to help create that world by boosting our collective collaborative literacy.

How We're Trying to Get There

Collaboration is a holistic craft.

You get good at craft through practice.

Build a community of collaboration practitioners by:

  • Modeling skillful, high-performance collaboration (especially continuous improvement)
  • Synthesizing the principles, practices, and lessons learned of high-performance collaboration
  • Nurturing and supporting other practitioners